Skip to main content

About your Search

20121001
20121031
SPONSOR
SHOW
( more )
STATION
CNNW 439
CNN 413
FBC 299
CNBC 225
WHUT (Howard University Television) 158
KQED (PBS) 144
WBAL (NBC) 144
WRC (NBC) 141
( more )
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,827 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX
Oct 21, 2012 11:00pm PDT
>>> up next on a second look, it brought the united states and the soviet union to the brink of nuclear war 50 years ago. how the cuban missile crisis began and how president kennedy searched for a way to keep from possibly going into war. and how the bay area prepared for the cold war with nuclear missile bases. >> reporter: hello everyone i'm frank somerville and welcome to a second look. 50 years ago tonight the world waited and watched to see if the united states would go into war with russia. a missell took pictures that revealed the soviet had built missile bases. it turned out the missells had already been there for three months. back in 2001, ktvu reporter george watson brought us this look back at those tense days when the united states and the soviet union stood on the brink of nuclear war, each waiting to see if the other would blink. >> a picket line of american warships cruised the waters off the coast of cuba. soviet ships possibly carrying nuclear missiles had been warned to turn back. it was a deadly dance at high noon in the sea. the cuban missile crisis took th
SFGTV2
Oct 3, 2012 8:30am PDT
of many in the united states in the most diverse state in the world's most averse democracy. the delegation will appreciate this as you walk the streets of san francisco at our best as it is across the state. people are living and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 1:25am EDT
said in an interview, "the united states both economically and mill tarle and also in terms of its overall influence is really is as strong as its ever been." he said this on february 21, 2012. do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it has ever been? >> it depends, david, if you are speaking about strong relative to whom. i think it is true we are still the most emulated in the world. but it is possible to be the world's cleanest dirty shirt. so i sort of america as going back to -- i have to answer this in a little bit of detail. in terms of, one of the things that made us strong to start with, and i would argue, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigration policy. so we get the most energy etic and talent
WHUT
Oct 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be decl
WHUT
Oct 26, 2012 6:00pm EDT
"democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodma
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was betting against roberts, too. then what would have happened is that somebody else would have stepped up. i think that roberts is different in some ways. he is much more polished in dealing with
SFGTV2
Oct 8, 2012 6:00am PDT
live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a loo
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 8:00pm EDT
conflict zone, a war zone, in a country where the united states may be very unpopular, people will relate to you as a human being. there will be local cultures of hospitality that take over and effectively protect you. you rely on your fellow human beings to look after you. often, as a foreigner, i am better taken care of by people in many places than if the same people i and interacting with were dealing with locals. >> what was the reaction to you as an american? >> it was ok. people are eager to meet an american, even when they are not happy to meet an american. they are polite. there was an occasion where i went to afghanistan to sit with a man who had been a notorious -- he was accused of being an opium trafficker. there was little doubt. he did not want to talk or see me. but it is afghanistan. i am his guest. he has to offer mitme tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give mime tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendli
SFGTV2
Oct 1, 2012 6:00am PDT
of the first sewer systems were on the east coast of the united states, often in places that already had developed a citywide water supply system. sullivan: in 1630, boston was basically three mountains, there were very steep hills. waste would run down quickly and dump into the harbor. and the tide would carry most of it away. well, this worked well for a while. the problem was, as boston wanted to expand, it started filling in the mudflats. the water could come rushing down the hill, it would hit the flat area and slow down. at high tide, it couldn't get out at all. it got so bad that the city took over, 'cause the city has a responsibility to protect its citizens. boston built the first modern sewer system in the united states. ours was completed between 1877 and 1884. with this wonderful new sewer system, we were taking our filth and moving it out to the ocean. of course, all of this was untreated. in the 1960s, we were still pumping all of our sewage out to moon island, untreated. we would get swimmers here, never knowing, in the middle of summer, why you would have a cold. well
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i exhort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wrongs, that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress had voted in favor of declaring war not one single member of the federalist party had voted in support of the war. northeastern federalists took a very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 very quickly became instead a test or and in addition a test of the strength and meaning of
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
for an amount that we decide is due to you. this was the situation. the united states up until that time was seen in iran as a friend of the national movement. iranian nationalism or struggle for them to become masters in their own house to get control of their own destiny started perhaps late in the 19th century or early in the 20th century, and although it united states wasn't a big player in the struggle when we did play we were usually on the right side. there are several famous incidents when the young american teacher by the name of how -- howard was fighting on the side of the constitutionalist and 1910, 1911 president taft sent a treasury team to help the constitutionalists get control of the budget and of the country's finances because the new without that, they were nothing and they had no chance. there was also frustrating. the u.s. was seen as playing a positive role in the azerbaijan crisis in helping iran to restore its sovereignty, territorial integrity. 1953 and what happened with the coup unfortunately changed all of that. one can argue why that happened, how that h
CNN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm PDT
your response be? >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising? >> how would you feel if one of your children dates a jew? i asked him about basic human rights of gays. >> do you believe that some are born homosexual? >> i absolutely believe that. >>> mr. president, welcome to new york. many americans see you as public en enny enemy number one. >> translator: good morning to you. i wish to greet all the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your programming at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me don't transfer that to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states. they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protest at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released whichocked the prophet. as a result there was an take on the american embassy. do you condemn his attack that caused his murder? >> translator: any action that is provocative offends the religious thoughts of
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 9:00am EDT
. most of the major national pollsters do not wait for party identification. in the united states. it's not true in britain but here, here they consider party identification and attitude, not a demographic. they weight for all the standard demographics because the census tells us how many men and women that are in the publishing of how many 18 to 20 euros and those over the age of 55 but by some of the pollsters in the united states are now reading for party invitations they're providing us with two very different pictures of where the election is. those that are waiting for party identification like you, showed no particular pickup for mitt romney after the first debate where as those who did not weight for party identification showed a romney came after the first debate. so very different things going on. as michael just said i would not be surprised if we do not see telephone calls by 2020. a third of households up from 17% in 2084 years ago, cell phones only as michael said, pollsters can't reach those households in the same way. this is a business that has very, very series problem
CNN
Oct 21, 2012 10:00am EDT
gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my take. the second presidential debate has bee
CBS
Oct 21, 2012 8:00am EDT
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. the association of the united states army's annual meeting kicks off this week amid pressure to slash spending on conferences. we'll talk about the impact of tighter government travel and conference rules. plus, a look at a compact new realtime facial recognition system that troops can use on the move. but first, the pentagon's new cyber strategy unveiled this month by defense secretary leon panetta makes it clear the u.s. military will take preemptive action if it detects a potential cyber attack that would kill americans or devastate american infrastructure. the aim is to make the threat of counterattack a powerful deterrent. is this the right cyber strategy for america? here with answers is irving la- chow the director of the program on u.s. national security in the information age at the the cent for new american security. irving welcome to the program. >> thank you very much. >> what's the importance of this statement especially at this time? >> i think secretary panetta had two goals in mind in issuing the statement. the
CNN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00pm PDT
ahmadinejad, at times combative. >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heed, especially when i asked him about basic hun rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that an extraordinary hour. piers morgan tonight starts now. mr. president, we will come to new york. to new york. >> the creator, the almighty, the most gracious and the most merciful. good morning to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity toward me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the profit, mohammed. as a result, there was an attack, as you kno
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 9:00am EDT
about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will
CNN
Oct 8, 2012 11:00am EDT
according to the republican nominee for the president of the united states. mitt romney is laying out his foreign policy platform in just about 20 minutes from now and we have the live cameras trained at the virginia military institute. will you hear him as he takes to the mic and possibly a global audience. you will hear it here on cnn and from our unmatched team of correspondents and analysts from d.c. to beijing to beirut. we have you completely covered and we'll begin with wolf blitz inner washington. when it comes to foreign policy credibility, the obama camp is comparing mitt romney to chevy chase and our most recent poll shows voters give the president a 7-point edge on world affairs. is a challenger, any challenger, be it mitt romney or anyone else, obliged to do this, obliged to become the commander in chief like more a moment and give a foreign policy speech right before the election? >> yes. mitt romney has been aggressively pursuing the foreign policy area because he thinks the president is vulnerable. yes, the president did manage to kill osama bin laden on his watch, but
CNN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity toward me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the profit, mohammed. as a result, there was an attack, as you know, on the american embassy in ben zazi and libya. the ambassador, christopher steven, was murdered. do you condemn the attack which caused his murder? >> fundamentally, first of all, any action that is provocative, off fenced the religious thoughts and feelings of any people, we condemn. likewise, we condemn any type of extremism. of course, what took place was ugly. offendering the holy prophet was quiting youly. it has nothing to do with freedom and freedom of speech this is the weaken and the abuse of freedom and in many places it is a crime. it shouldn't take place and
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 11:00pm EDT
refusal to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. becau
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:00pm EDT
ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rockstar
WHUT
Oct 7, 2012 7:00am EDT
. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encoun
WHUT
Oct 24, 2012 10:00am EDT
the united states maintain, deployment all over the world and maintain military capacity to go into many regions of the world and defeat regional adversaries, maintain diplomatic influence and presence to be able to resolve many crises in the world, in short, it has the u.s. as the basic world solution to many problems, and my argument is that that posture is becoming insolvent, for a variety of reasons, not only are domestic economic problems that are making our current level of defense expenditures unsustainable but also transit world politics that are leading to a world of increasingly assertive emerging powers that definitely still want american leadership, but are yes, sir and, less and less tolerant of a world in which america dictates the outcome of problems so for those and other reasons i think that the default paradigm we have relied on is becoming unsustainable and we need to begin a dialogue about new options, new concepts that would underwrite a more sustainable vision for u.s. leadership going forward. >> rose: okay. having said that, david, ignatius, what was it that
WETA
Oct 24, 2012 12:00pm EDT
only the united states really, can really, can really do that today or has the will to do that in the capacity and industry talked to many people in the private sector who really are enthused about becoming more closer with our public policy, to shape the future overseas and benefit our economy as well. >> rose: before i go to david and michael, you have argued before that the united states, help me understand exactly the words you would use, but principally coming out of iraq, lost its credibility with the rest of the world, lost its admiration from the rest of the world? >> yes, i would use the word legitimacy. i thought much of the world thought america's engagement in the world in the traditional word here is leadership was legitimate because it stood in a wider sense for the collective interests and not just our own. i think the fact that we fought a war on the basis of such falsified justification without real good case that it was either in our national interests or anybody else's national interest i think has discredited the united states. but i continue to think that the
NBC
Oct 28, 2012 11:30am EDT
weariness in america but what it's level of responsibility that the united states feels should any of these things go south, in terms of what we've tried to create in terms of stable governments? >> i think what you saw in the debates that was governor romney and president obama both understand the american people are sick and tired of these wars. they are sorry they ever heard of the place called the middle east. they just want out. and so the question is how do you, to the degree you can, shape the environment after you get out? and i think that's what all of this talk about 2014 in afghanistan is, to focus the minds of afghan leaders. we are not going to be around. and i actually think iraq has gone better than i expected. so, who knows. afghanistan might too. i'm actually though in the long run, more pessimistic about afghanistan than i am about iraq. >> start by why do you think iraq has gone better than expected and then michael will talk about where you think there's gaps in this path's approach to t. >> i thought that iraq would unravel after the americans left. in fact, aid s
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 1:00pm EDT
received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the
WHUT
Oct 21, 2012 11:00am EDT
is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 6,827 (some duplicates have been removed)